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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
. this was not pretty. was it enough to secure a cabinet position? here is cnn's chris lawrence. >> they attacked chuck hagel from all sides. >> why do you think the iranian foreign ministry so strongly supports your nomination for secretary of defense? >> give me an example where we've been intim dated by the israeli jewish lobby to do something dumb? >> at time he stumbled through his answers and had to repeatedly correct himself. >> i have just been handed a note that i misspoke. >> reporter: leading one senator to say -- >> i want to clarify the clarify. >> reporter: in the muddle, some things became clear. hagel supports a negotiated reductions in america's nuclear weapons. he'll push for spouses of gay and lesbian troops to receive benefits and he believes the u.s. should talk with iran about its nuclear program. >> that's not negotiation. engagement is not appeasement. >> reporter: the most heated exchange goes back years to a disagreement over iraq. >> you said that the surge would be the most dangerous policy blunder in this country since vietnam. were you correct? yes or no? >> my reference t
a safe haven for zombies ever. >>> and the dance that's everywhere, even here at cnn, the harlem shake. >>> just when you think we've got it all worked out, cutting-edge technology, scientific breakthroughs, miracle medicine, lately there's been talk about colonizing mars and many of you carry around a supercomputer right in your pocket. but just when you think you have it all worked out, the univers reminds us, we really don't. case in point, friday a chunk of space rock gets sucked in by the earth's gravitational pull. then streaks across the sky above russia. as it rockets through the atmosphere, friction heats the front of the rock a lot more than the back of it. the huge temperature difference is too much and essentially turns a meteor into a bomb. it explodes into a bunch of pieces. and what you're hearing here, that boom, boom, boom, is this -- take a look. those pieces are moving so fast they set up a series of sonic booms and it's just a scary sound. the sheer force is destructive, blowing out windows, knocking down huge doors and even taking down walls. there are reports that
here at cnn, the harlem shake. >>> just when you think we've got it all worked out, cutting-edge technology, scientific breakthroughs, miracle medicine, lately there's been talk about colonizing mars and many of you carry around a supercomputer right in your pocket. but just when you think you have it all worked out, the universe reminds us, we really don't. case in point, friday a chunk of space rock gets sucked in by the earth's gravitational pull. then streaks across the sky above russia. as it rockets through the atmosphere, friction heats the front of the rock a lot more than the back of it. the huge temperature difference is too much and essentially turns a meteor into a bomb. it explodes into a bunch of pieces. and what you're hearing here, that boom, boom, boom, is this -- take a look. those pieces are moving so fast they set up a series of sonic booms and it's just a scary sound. the sheer force is destructive, blowing out windows, knocking down huge doors and even taking down walls. there are reports that a huge chunk of it landed in a russian lake. many would like
, the notion of americans checking the news on their phones or going to cnn or watching c-span. these things were cultivated in that period sauternes out pulitzer played a historically significant role and the fascinating life that made for great reading but the influence he yielded is with us today. the reason people don't remember pulitzer today as much is in some ways his accomplishment is so happenstance. we're so used to what it is. in the nineteenth century, printing was the internet. i can book a ticket now or everyday -- all commonplace things we don't think it's such a great deal and in some way i am not sure americans remember who morgan was or who rockefeller was or who carnegie was but we drive across a bridges made with steel, that is the carnegie gift, using cars powered by oil, all the world that rockefeller built and using a financial system built on morgan and consuming news built on a system developed and created by people like pulitzer. pulitzer was born in the 1840s and came to the united states as a mercenary soldier to fight in the vietnam-the civil war. they went to re
if you looked at cnn yesterday afternoon, the killing in syria, it came to an end. >> it did. >> yesterday on capitol hill, republicans and democrats hugged. the whole idea of an historic hold on the secretary of defense, they said, you know what? let's put this to the side because of this cruise ship debacle. i mean, mika, all of the things we worry about -- the national debt clock stopped. >> basically the world stopped. >> we don't have to worry. paul krugman's right. we don't have to worry anymore because cnn tells us that this cruise ship was the only story that mattered yesterday for 24 hours. >> that's right. >> and you know what? makes me feel pretty good about the state of the world. >> and i'm glad they're home. >> that nothing is happening to that degree that they can do that. i think that's very exciting for all of us. i'm very pleased. >> it's very good when the world stops to be told that. >> perspective it be reassuring. >> it's all relative. that's true. >> it's all relative. syria, come on. people are dying. middle east peace breaking up. that doesn't matter.
every day, the notion of americans check in the news on their phones, are going to cnn or c-span, these are things cultivated in that. -- in that period. he led a fascinating life, but his influence that he yielded is still with us today. >> to not put some -- such unlimited power into the hands of husbands. remember, all men could be tyrants if they could. if particular care and attention is not paid to the ladies, we are determined to foment are -- a rebellion. >> abigail adams, one of the women who served as first lady and c-span's the original series, "first ladies: influence and image." this was produced with the white house historical association. season one begins present state, february 18, at 9:00 p.m. eastern and pacific on c-span, c-span radio, and on c-span.org. >> "washington journal" continues. host: patrick reis is with politico and writes on finance and economic issues. he's your to talk about the job issues -- the job numbers announced yesterday. the economy added 150,000 new jobs, but the unemployment rate ticked up to 7.9%, which is what we have there on o
something? i heard some legal analysts on cnn saying his story seems plausible. i'm like really? maybe it's just because of the defense attorney. >> cricket bat part is a little -- >> stephanie: if you think -- who shoots through a bathroom door? >> someone come in through the bathroom window. >> stephanie: are you stealing my cialis? weird to shoot -- if you think your intruder is in the bathroom. >> if you didn't see someone go in the bathroom. >> stephanie: i don't know. >> but the cricket bat thing. >> stephanie: dna and stuff. >> the bathroom door was locked from the inside, not from the outside. so why would the intruder lock himself in the bathroom? >> wanted to check and see if it was locked. i'm not sure he had his legs on. [farting sounds] >> stephanie: does the intruder say i'm going to come out and steal some [ bleep ] in a minute. >> only reason they would lock themselves in would be defense. >> stephanie: it just doesn't seem that plausible to me. >> unless it is one of the things you can lock from the outside and you can shut it and you can't -- whatever. >> stephanie: when
" and a cnn contributor. after each one speaks we'll take questions from the audience. finally, please form all statements in the form of a question. thanks. >> thank you. it is a pleasure to be here tonight. it is the earlier i've been out of the office. what should a supporter of free markets and enterprise think of immigration? what should a good policy be? i think this answer -- the answer to this question is simple and straight forward. now, legal immigration, whether through a program or permanent migration it should be easier for people throughout the world, especially for workers. i think this conclusion is easy and simple to reach. i think it -- it doesn't matter what basis you approach it from. whether you like free markets because of toldtarian arguments. i think the answer is all the same. now, let's give you a setup. of all the markets in the world that has to do with the flows and goods enservice of the cross borders, labor is the most reing strictive of all of them. the labor market is one of the most important of them. free marketers know that deregulating, allowing more com
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)